#33 Restrepo is one of those films I’d been meaning to watch but hadn’t gotten around to. I think since Netflix started rapidly expanding their instant watch titles I’ve become much lazier about watching films I actually should see and watch movies that are easy to watch and entertaining (or watching all of Ugly Betty in less than a week). Restrepo was a mix of gut-wrenching interviews and actual footage from a group of U.S. soldiers stationed in one of the most deadly places in the world, deep in the hills of Afghanistan.
What was depressing for me was the flash forward and back once people had died between the footage at the beginning of the film  when they were alive and when they were killed. Probably the most horrifying moment in modern film was when the young solider being interviewed said to the camera, while wearing an eerily broad smile, that he had tried four or five different sleeping pills and still couldn’t sleep. For him, not sleeping was much better than sleeping and re-living his nightmares over and over and over again. My heart burned for this man, who looked not much older than myself, who will forever be haunted by what he saw and dealt with in Afghanistan for their fifteen-month deployment. I can’t believe what I saw, both good and bad (particularly a very enthusiastic dance party to some techno music at one point), and I can’t believe that people are still in this war that started what seems like a lifetime ago.

#33 Restrepo is one of those films I’d been meaning to watch but hadn’t gotten around to. I think since Netflix started rapidly expanding their instant watch titles I’ve become much lazier about watching films I actually should see and watch movies that are easy to watch and entertaining (or watching all of Ugly Betty in less than a week). Restrepo was a mix of gut-wrenching interviews and actual footage from a group of U.S. soldiers stationed in one of the most deadly places in the world, deep in the hills of Afghanistan.

What was depressing for me was the flash forward and back once people had died between the footage at the beginning of the film  when they were alive and when they were killed. Probably the most horrifying moment in modern film was when the young solider being interviewed said to the camera, while wearing an eerily broad smile, that he had tried four or five different sleeping pills and still couldn’t sleep. For him, not sleeping was much better than sleeping and re-living his nightmares over and over and over again. My heart burned for this man, who looked not much older than myself, who will forever be haunted by what he saw and dealt with in Afghanistan for their fifteen-month deployment. I can’t believe what I saw, both good and bad (particularly a very enthusiastic dance party to some techno music at one point), and I can’t believe that people are still in this war that started what seems like a lifetime ago.